WUOT Open House

Join us for WUOT's annual open house, Monday, August 7, from 4-7 p.m.

Wendell Potter On Fake News and Critical Thinking

Wendell Potter will participate in the Truth and Consequences Symposium this week, and he's somewhat of an expert in "fake news" as it used to be called: propaganda. He worked in the health insurance industry, helping deliver the message of insurers hoping to shape legislation on their industry. He's since become a consumer advocate, and is helping to build Tarbell , a non-profit news organization that hopes to dissect complicated topics and propose solutions to some of our seemingly...

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Improvisations WUOT's locally-produced weekday jazz program, hosted by John Habel , Todd Steed, Paul Parris, and Chris Woodhull.

Stretch & Bobbito On Race, Hip-Hop, And Belonging

53 minutes ago

For most of the 1990s, Adrian "Stretch" Bartos and Robert "Bobbito" Garcia hosted a famous weekly hip-hop radio show on Columbia University's campus radio station, WKCR. Their no-frills, four-hour show was broadcast during the wee hours of the morning — 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. on Friday mornings — on a low-strength signal that listeners had to be deliberate about searching out.

NPR Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman and Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep discuss President Trump's tweets announcing the military will not allow transgender people to serve.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missouri already has some of the strictest abortion laws in the country. Now it's looking to place new requirements on the procedure, including having doctors meet with women seeking abortions before formal consent can be given and requiring the health department to hold unannounced annual inspections of abortion clinics.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

President Trump has announced that the government will not allow transgender people to serve in the U.S. military.

In a series of tweets on Wednesday morning, he wrote:

Updated at 11:55 a.m. ET

A senior FBI official said Wednesday the nation is "under relentless assault" from foreign adversaries, as the Senate Judiciary Committee continued its probe into Russia's interference with last year's presidential election.

Bill Priestap, assistant director of counterintelligence at the FBI, painted a bleak picture of efforts — both overt and covert — by foreign government agents inside the U.S. "Our economy, our national security and our way of life are being actively threatened by state actors and their proxies," he said.

"Dear Dickie," the woman wrote on thin parchment paper. "Here I am, so please don't scold me ..."

The Jan. 2, 1947, letter had made its journey from Honolulu to Kobe, Japan, courtesy of a 5-cent airmail stamp — evidence of an overseas courtship between two young people. She began with an apology for not writing sooner but quickly eased into flirting and teasing, anticipating the day when they would see each other again.

France is asking European neighbors to help it fight fast-growing wildfires that have consumed thousands of acres of forest near the Mediterranean coast, forcing tourists to leave an area that's normally packed with visitors in the summer.

Several large fires have struck near the French Riviera this week, in resort areas near Saint-Tropez and also on the island of Corsica. Their rapid growth is being blamed on dry and windy conditions, and plentiful fuel.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich tells NPR's Rachel Martin that President Donald Trump is right to be troubled that Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the Justice Department's investigation into Russian collusion in the 2016 election. The Justice Department's culture, Gingrich says, is "very liberal" and has an anti-Trump bias and the probe is a "fishing expedition." Sessions, he says, should exercise more authority and enforce the law.

Domenico Montanaro has analysis.

Crumbs may seem harmless here on Earth, but they can be a hazard in microgravity — they could get in an astronaut's eye, or get inhaled, causing someone to choke. Crumbs could even float into an electrical panel, burn up or cause a fire.

That's part of the reason why it was a very big deal in 1965 when John Young pulled a corned beef sandwich out of his pocket as he was orbiting the earth with Gus Grissom.

"Where did that come from?" Grissom asked Young.

"I brought it with me," Young said.

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